• TMCC High School
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    TMCC HIGH SCHOOL COURSES
      

    Regular Education

    Credits

    English 3-4

    1.00/year

    English 5-6

    1.00/year 

    English 7-8

    1.00/year

    Formal Geometry

    1.00/year

    Algebra 2

    1.00/year

    Math Support

    0.00

    American Government 1-2

    1.00/year

    United States History 1-2

    1.00/year

    World History 1-2

    1.00/year

    Running Start

    .25/year

    Enrichment

    .25/semester

    Leadership

    1.00/year

    Future Business Leaders of America 

    0.00

    Academic Olympics    

    0.00

    Yearbook

    .50/year 

    College Dual Credit    

    .25 – 2.0/semester

     

    ENGLISH CLASSES

    English  3-4                                                                                                                          Course #1211-1212

    Full Year = 1 credit

    This one-year course will continue to develop the fundamentals of communication skills – reading, writing, speaking and listening—using the Nevada Academic Content Standards (NVACS) and End of Course (EOC) selected standards to guide and focus instruction.  Through close reading of a variety of grade-appropriate, high-quality contemporary works, classical literature, and literary nonfiction, students will continue to develop the reading comprehension skills and reading strategies required to be highly literate individuals, as well as be prepared to take and pass the ELA EOC final exam.  Students will engage in both short and long-term writing assignments in three main genres--argument, informative/explanatory, and narrative--as well as use writing as a way to comprehend text.  Language instruction will focus on the balance between rules and manipulating language for the purpose of craft as well as building an extensive vocabulary.  Research and technology will be embedded throughout the course.  The course will be taught using a variety of teaching techniques from direct instruction to small group work with a focus on meaningful student discussion.  As a part of this course, students are required to take the Nevada End of Course Final for English as the semester 2 final exam.

    English 5-6                                                                                                                          Course #1231-1232

    Full Year = 1 credit

    This Nevada Academic Content Standards (NVACS) aligned, one-year course will strengthen and expand students’ skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening necessary for college and career readiness in a twenty-first century, globally competitive society.  Through close reading of a variety of grade-appropriate, high-quality contemporary works, seminal U.S. documents, the classics of American literature, and literary nonfiction, students will gain the capacity to challenge complex texts in all subjects.  Students will engage in both short and long-term writing assignments in three main genres--argument, informative/explanatory, and narrative--as well as use writing as a way to comprehend text.  Language instruction will focus on the balance between rules and manipulating language for the purpose of craft; and students will continue to build an extensive vocabulary.  Research and technology will be embedded throughout the course.  The course will be taught using a variety of teaching techniques from direct instruction to small group work with a focus on meaningful student discussion.

    English 7-8 (Not offered for the 2016-17)                                                              Course #1251-1252

    Full Year = 1 credit

    This Nevada Academic Content Standards (NVACS) aligned, one-year course will reflect the culmination of skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening necessary for college and career readiness in a twenty-first century, globally competitive society, and reflects the integration of the Nevada Academic Content Standards and student learning outcomes from Early College English.  The course will focus on both short and long-term writing assignments in three main genres--argument, informative/explanatory, and narrative—necessary to prepare students for college-level writing.  Additionally, writing will be generated from the critical reading of a variety of grade-appropriate, high-quality contemporary works, classical literature, and literary nonfiction primarily focused on British and world authors.  Students will continue to gain literary and cultural knowledge and the capacity to challenge complex texts in all subjects.  Students at this level should have mastered the conventions of Standard English and language instruction should focus on manipulating language for the purpose of craft.  Students will continue to build an extensive vocabulary.  Research and technology will be embedded throughout the course.  The course will be taught using a variety of teaching techniques from direct instruction to small group work with a focus on meaningful student discussion.

     

    MATHEMATICS CLASSES

     

    FORMAL GEOMETRY                                                                                                                      Course #2215/2216

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all semesters of Algebra 1.  Admission into Formal Geometry will be based on the student’s previous performance in addition to teacher recommendation, student’s desire to learn and work ethic.   

    1 Year = 1 math credit (Honors)

    This is a one-year course that will cover the following topics through emphasis on basic geometric proofs, axioms, postulates and theorems, plane geometric figures, right triangles with trigonometry (Law of Sine and Cosine), constructions, congruence and similarity, circles, coordinate and transformational geometry, inductive and deductive reasoning, three-dimensional geometry, and probability. Emphasis is on the development of deductive reasoning skills. Students will also review algebraic techniques, and work on realistic problems. An ability to think abstractly is critical for successful completion of this course. As a part of this course, students are required to take the Nevada End Of Course Final for Math II (Geometry) as the semester 2 final exam.

    ALGEBRA 2 HONORS                                                                                                                     Course #2227/2228

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all semesters of Algebra 1 and Formal Geometry. Admission into Algebra 2 (H) will be based on the student’s previous performance in addition to teacher recommendation, student’s desire to learn and work ethic.

    1 Year = 1 math credit (Honors) 

    This is a one-year course, designed for students with a strong understanding of the concepts learned in Algebra 1 and Geometry. This course will build upon the student’s problem solving and algebraic skills in preparation for advanced mathematics courses through a course that addresses the rigor expected of an honors level course.  The major topics of study are relations and functions, domain and range of parent functions, systems of nonlinear equations, polynomials and polynomial functions, complex numbers, quadratic equations, rational and radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, statistics, and matrices.  Throughout the year, students will continue to develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, apply learned concepts to new problem-solving situations, and exhibit increased confidence in their ability to solve mathematical problems.

    Math Support

    Math Support is a required not-for-credit class for all TMCC High School students enrolled in a college math class. Students attend a Math Support section of their choice once a week to demonstrate their college math grade and ask questions. Any TMCCHS student can drop in for math tutoring during any Math Support.

    SOCIAL STUDIES 

    American Government 1-2                                                                                                                                      Course #4161/4162

    Full Year = 1 credit

    Productive civic engagement requires knowledge of the historical foundations and principles of American democracy, understanding the unique processes of local, state, and national institutions, the skills necessary to apply civic dispositions and democratic principles, and an understanding of the complex workings of the American economy. In this year long course, students will analyze the powers and civic responsibilities of citizens and examine the origins, functions, and structure of the U.S. government. Content will include multiple historical eras and the various changing perspectives in America’s past, as well as connections between historical events. Economics is grounded in knowledge about how people choose to use resources. Economic decision making involves setting goals and identifying the resources available to achieving those goals. Students will examine concepts and tools necessary to foster an economic way of thinking to better understand the interaction of buyers and sellers in markets, workings of the national economy, and interactions within the global marketplace. Some of the topics of study will include, but are not limited to, the following: founding documents, the federal system, the legislative process, the judicial system, the executive branch, elections, political parties, interest groups, rights and responsibilities of citizens, international relations, public policy, economic policies, media literacy, and contemporary issues.

    US History 1-2                                                                                                                                                   Course #4131/4132

    Full Year = 1 credit

    This course focuses on the history of the United States from the turn of the century to the present day. American founding documents and democratic principles will provide for the foundation referenced throughout this course while maintaining focus on the multicultural history, economics, civics, and geography of the modern era. This course includes multiple and varied voices and perspectives for a vivid and complex picture of U.S. History. Students in the course will engage in historical thinking, robust academic discussions, and informational and argumentative writing. Some of the topics of study will include, but are not limited to, the following: Nativism/Populism, Imperialism, the Gilded Age/Industrial Revolution, Progressivism, WWI, the 1920s, the Great Depression, WWII, the Civil Rights Movement, the Cold War, the rights movements of the 1970s, globalism, terrorism, and modern issues.

    World History 1-2                                                                                                                                                      Course #4101/4102

    Full Year = 1 credit

    This course focuses on World History from approximately the mid-1300s to the modern day. Students will examine important concepts in geography, history, and culture pertaining to regions around the globe. Students will analyze significant events, individuals, developments and processes across the world from the perspective of multiple and varied voices for a vivid and complex picture of history. This course is global in nature, with a multicultural, rather than Eurocentric, approach. Students will engage in historical thinking, robust academic discussions, and informational and argumentative writing. Some of the topics of study will include, but are not limited to, the following: the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, global expansion, empires and kingdoms of the world, the Enlightenment and revolutions, the rise of nation states, imperialism, industrialization, WWI, 20th Century revolutions, global depression, WWII, decolonization, the Cold War, globalization, and modern issues.

    RUNNING START

    GOAL: To support and encourage those students who are ready to take on an all college schedule that significantly moves them toward an identified major or career.

    • Students will progress through a career exploration unit and then swiftly identify and apply to schools, completing all required elements and more.
    • Students will meet certain key requirements so that they are keeping up with the regular TMCC High School population and with their needs as young adults-completing a quality resume/cover letter.
    • Students will participate in an end of year portfolio project.

    ENRICHMENT

    Enrichment is a course that has been designed to help students succeed at TMCC High School. The work that is done in Enrichment will support success in both college courses and high school classes. Enrichment will be used to work on homework, participate in study groups, and contribute to group discussions related to core values and work ethic.

    LEADERSHIP

    Participants in TMCC High School’s Leadership program will develop and practice leadership skills within the school and throughout the community. The class meets twice a week and requires commitment to outside activities. To earn .5 credit per semester, students must attend 2 hours and 40 minutes of class each week and participate in outside activities an average of an additional 55 minutes per week to meet the state requirement of 3 hours and 35 minutes per week to earn .5 credit. Students’ outside activities should add up to a minimum of 16.5 additional hours. There are a number of options related to class projects, in four distinct areas:

    Community service; FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America); Social media/marketing of TMCC High School and school activities’ and School-Community outreach.

    Class activities will include lessons in: the concept and practice of effective leadership, business, networking, public speaking, and planning and implementing projects including community service and event planning. Leadership class fee is $45 the first year and $30 any years thereafter. Fees include the purchase of two shirts for outreach work with students and the business community. This fee is due upon school registration.

    Class Grades: There are only 3 possible grades: A, B, or F. No C’s or D’s, as mediocrity is NOT AN OPTION!

    ACADEMIC OLYMPICS
     
    Academic Olympics is a competition modeled on television’s “College Bowl” and is supported by the WCSD Gifted and Talented program. Students from twelve area schools participate through a series of "round robin" pairings held weekly for five weeks culminating in the tournament "play-off". Teams accumulate points for correct answers in the following categories: Math, Physical Science, Life Science, Current Events, English/Literature, Economics/Government, Fine Arts, History/Geography. 
     
    NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
     
    The National Honor Society (NHS) is the nation's premier organization established to recognize outstanding high school students. More than just an honor roll, NHS serves to recognize those students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of scholarship, service, leadership, and character. These characteristics have been associated with membership in the organization since its beginning in 1921.

    Additionally, high school seniors who are National Honor Society (NHS) members in good standing of an affiliated NHS chapter are eligible to apply for the NHS scholarship.

    We encourage students who make the minimum 3.5 weighted GPA requirement to take the opportunity to apply for membership to NHS!

    YEARBOOK

    This student lead course follows Nevada Academic Content Standards (NVACS) as students take the yearbook from concept to actual sales. Students will develop leadership, design, writing, and marketing skills as they learn photography, page layout, design, and logistics. The yearbook is a creative and detail-oriented endeavor that gives students a real word canvas to hone their skills in writing and visual arts. The vision for each year’s book is a collaborative effort. Each student is given several responsibilities from photography, writing and visual art to logistics, editing, and sales. Students learn group skills working in task groups and with the class as a while. The course starts in September and ends in March.

    DUAL CREDIT

    Students earn high school credit while taking college classes.For a complete listing of all Dual Credit classes refer to the Dual Credit Course listing found on www.washoeschools.net TMCC High School awards Dual Credit Classes differently than students taking college courses at their zoned high school.

     

    TMCC
    High School Students:

    • College Course Lower than 100 level (3 credit class) receive .50/credit with no honors designation.
    • College Physical Education Classes (1 credit class) receive .50/credit with no honors designation.
    • College Course (1 credit class) receive .25/credit with no honors designation.
    • College Course 100 level or greater (3 credit class) receive .50/credit with .25 honors designation.
    • College Course 100 level or greater (4 credit class) receive 1.0/credit with .50 honors designation.